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Installing OpenACS on Mac OS X

Created by OpenACS community, last modified by Gustaf Neumann 28 Nov 2016, at 03:18 AM

See one of these:

Should you decide to Install OpenACS from source using general en:openacs-system-install instructions, refer to these notes for changes:

Installing PostgreSql

OS X conventions

On Mac OS X type sudo su - to become root.

Use curl -L -O instead of wget

If you are running Mac OS X prior to 10.3, you should be able to install and use PostGreSQL 7.3.x. Mac OS X 10.3 requires PostGreSQL 7.4. Note: if you're installing PG on an Intel Mac, you'll need to install 8.x; 7.4.x won't compile because of a lack of "native spinlock support" -- and this is something that the PG maintainers aren't inclined to fix. See this. PG 8.0.x installs fine, as does PG 8.1 or 8.2.

Creating postgres user

Do this instead:

First make sure the gids and uids below are available (change them if they are not). To list taken uids and gids:

nireport / /groups name gid | grep "[0-9][0-9][0-9]"
nireport / /users name uid | grep "[0-9][0-9][0-9]"

Now you can install the users

sudo niutil -create / /groups/web
sudo niutil -createprop / /groups/web gid 201
sudo niutil -create / /users/postgres
sudo niutil -createprop / /users/postgres gid 201
sudo niutil -createprop / /users/postgres uid 502
sudo niutil -createprop / /users/postgres home /usr/local/pgsql
sudo niutil -create / /users/$OPENACS_SERVICE_NAME
sudo niutil -createprop / /users/$OPENACS_SERVICE_NAME gid  201
sudo niutil -createprop / /users/$OPENACS_SERVICE_NAME uid 201
mkdir -p /usr/local/pgsql
chown -R postgres:web /usr/local/pgsql /usr/local/src/postgresql-7.4.7
chmod 750 /usr/local/pgsql

Compile and install PostgreSQL

If you're using Fink:

Append --with-includes=/sw/include/ --with-libraries=/sw/lib flags to ./configure.

./configure --with-includes=/sw/include/ --with-libraries=/sw/lib

Set PostgreSQL to start on boot

cd /Library/StartupItems/
tar xfz /var/lib/aolserver/$OPENACS_SERVICE_NAME/packages/acs-core-docs/www/files/osx-postgres-startup-item.tgz

Alternatively, one can use an XML file like the following to start postgres via launchd (specifying the postgres binary directory and database directory)

For Mac OS X Tiger (10.4.*), use:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple Computer//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd">
<plist version="1.0">
<dict>
	<key>GroupName</key>
	<string>nsadmin</string>
	<key>Label</key>
	<string>org.postgresql.PostgreSQL</string>
	<key>OnDemand</key>
	<false/>
	<key>ProgramArguments</key>
	<array>
		<string>/usr/local/pg820/bin/pg_ctl</string>
		<string>-D</string>
		<string>/usr/local/pg820/data</string>
		<string>-l</string>
		<string>/usr/local/pg820/data/server.log</string>
		<string>start</string>
	</array>
	<key>ServiceDescription</key>
	<string>PostgreSQL Server</string>
	<key>UserName</key>
	<string>postgres</string>
</dict>
</plist>

For Mac OS X Leopard (10.5.*), use:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd">
<plist version="1.0">
<dict>
	<key>Label</key>
	<string>org.postgresql.PostgreSQL</string>
	<key>UserName</key>
	<string>postgres</string>
	<key>GroupName</key>
	<string>nsadmin</string>
	<key>OnDemand</key>
	<false/>
	<key>ProgramArguments</key>
	<array>
		<string>/usr/local/pg820/bin/postmaster</string>
		<string>-D</string>
		<string>/usr/local/pg820/data</string>
		<string>-c</string>
		<string>log_connections=YES</string>
	</array>
</dict>
</plist>

Save the above files as /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.postgresql.PostgreSQL.plist and postgres will be started automatically on the next boot of the system. One can use launchctl to start the service for testing;

 

launchctl % load /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.postgresql.PostgreSQL.plist % start org.postgresql.PostgreSQL % ^D

To get Tcl to build on Leopard or newer

for compiling under Mac OS X Leopard or newer, use the following flags to compile Tcl:

./configure --prefix=/opt/aolserver --enable-threads --disable-corefoundation --enable-symbols

 

To get tDOM to build on tiger

  1. Download and install/update to the latest version of xcode tools (version2.2) from http://developer.apple.com/tools/xcode which updates the gcc compiler.
     
  2. Then make some additional changes to the unix/CONFIG file (after modifying the unix/CONFIG file according to instructions at en:aolserver-install, uncomment:
    'CC=gcc; export CC'
  3. add a new line, somewhere after the first line:
    export CPP="/usr/bin/cpp"

When versions of aolservers different to aolserver 4.5 (head, including changes from Mar 22, 2008) are used, aolserver is likely to segfault on startup due to recent changes in the Mac OS X System libraries. To avoid this, use

ulimit -n 256

in the startup script (don't use unlimited).

End-users - Requirements

Created by Torben Brosten, last modified by Michael Aram 25 Nov 2016, at 12:08 PM

Documentation Requirements for End-users

By the OpenACS Community. This section is a collection of documentation requirements that have been expressed in the OpenACS forums to 4th July 2003.

OpenACS end-user documentation should meet the following requirements. No significance has been given to the order presented, topic breadth or depth here.

  • End-users should not have to read docs to use the system.

  • Include how to get help. How and where to find answers, contact others, what to do if one gets an AOLserver or other error when using the system. Include types of available support (open-source, private commercial etc.) including references.

  • Explain/foster understanding of the overall structure of the system. This would be an overview of the system components, how it works, and how to find out more or dig deeper... To promote the system by presenting the history of the system, and writing about some tacit knowledge re: OpenACS.org and the opensource culture.

  • Introduce and inspire readers about the uses, benefits, and the possibilities this system brings (think customer solution, customer cost, convenience, value). A comprehensive community communications system; How this system is valuable to users; Reasons others use OpenACS (with quotes in their own words) "...the most important thing that the ACS does is manage users, i.e. provide a way to group, view and manipulate members of the web community. -- Talli Somekh, September 19, 2001" using it to communicate, cooperate, collaborate... OpenACS offers directed content functionality with the OpenACS templating system. ... OpenACS is more than a data collection and presentation tool. OpenACS has management facilities that are absent in other portals. ...The beauty of OpenACS is the simplicity (and scalability) of the platform on which it is built and the library of tried and tested community building tools that are waiting to be added. It seems that most portals just add another layer of complexity to the cake. See Slides on OACS features...a set of slides on OACS features that can be used for beginners who want to know OACS is about and what they can do with it. Screen captures that highlight features. Example shows BBoard, calendar, news, file storage, wimpy point, ticket tracking. An OpenACS tour; an abbreviated, interactive set of demo pages.

  • From a marketing perspective,

    • differentiate "product" by highlighting features, performance quality, conformance to standards, durability (handling of technological obsolescence), reliability, repairability, style of use, design (strategy in design, specifications, integrated, well-matched systems etc).

    • differentiate "service" by highlighting software availability (licensing and completeness from mature to early adopters or development versions), community incident support, project collaborative opportunities, and contractor support availability

    • differentiate price (economic considerations of opensource and features)

    • Discussion and details should rely on meeting criteria of design, completeness of implementation, and related system strengths and weaknesses. Marketing should not rely on comparing to other technologies. Competitive analysis involves mapping out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats when compared to other systems for a specific purpose, and thus is inappropriate (and becomes stale quickly) for general documentation.

    • When identifying subsystems, such as tcl, include links to their marketing material if available.

    • create an example/template comparison table that shows versions of OpenACS and other systems (commonly competing against OpenACS) versus a summary feature list and how well each meets the feature criteria. Each system should be marked with a date to indicate time information was gathered, since information is likely volatile.

     

  • To build awareness about OpenACS, consider product differentiation: form, features, performance quality, conformance quality (to standards and requirements), durability, reliability, repairability, style, design: the deliberate planning of these product attributes.

  • Include jargon definitions, glossary, FAQs, site map/index, including where to find Instructions for using the packages. FAQ should refer like answers to the same place for consistency, brevity and maintainability.

  • Explain/tutorial on how the UI works (links do more than go to places, they are active), Page flow, descriptions of form elements; browser/interface strengths and limitations (cookies, other)

  • Discuss criteria used to decide which features are important, and the quality of the implementation from a users perspective. Each project implementation places a different emphasis on the various criteria, which is why providing a framework to help decide is probably more useful than an actual comparison.

Package documentation requirements have additional requirements.

  • A list of all packages, their names, their purposes, what they can and cannot do (strengths, limitations), what differentiates them from similar packages, minimal description, current version, implementation status, author/maintainers, link(s) to more info. Current version available at the repository.

  • Include dependencies/requirements, known conflicts, and comments from the real world edited into a longer description to quickly learn if a package is appropriate for specific projects.

  • Create a long bulleted list of features. Feature list should go deeper than high-level feature lists and look at the quality of the implementations (from the user's perspective, not the programmer's). Example issues an end-user may have questions about: Ticket Tracker and Ticket Tracker Lite, why would I want one of them vs the other? And, before I specify to download and install it, what credit card gateways are supported by the current e-commerce module? There are some packages where the name is clear enough, but what are the limitations of the standard package?

  • End-user docs should not be duplicative. The package description information and almost everything about a package for administrators and developers is already described in the package itself through two basic development document templates: a Requirements Template and Detailed Design Document.

OpenACS Performance Tuning

Created by OpenACS community, last modified by Gustaf Neumann 23 Nov 2016, at 12:08 AM

OpenACS Performance Tuning

Here is some documentation on general OpenACS performance tuning:

Much performance tuning is targeted at the subsystems level, and so you will find some specific tuning information in these pages:

A broad scope of causes can be attributed to OpenACS performance issues. These forum threads help identify useful diagnostic techniques and accurate testing to help narrow the scope of problem areas etc.

Windows-OpenACS

Created by Maurizio Martignano, last modified by Maurizio Martignano 12 Nov 2016, at 02:59 PM

Windows-OpenACS (vers. 3.1.13 - November 2016) is a  Windows 64 port of OpenACS 5.9.0 and the latest snapshot of NaviServer and is available here.

This port installs and runs on the following systems:

  • Windows 8.1,
  • Windows 10,
  • Windows Server 2012 R2, and
  • Windows Server 2016 TP.

 

OpenACS compatibility matrix

Created by Joel Aufrecht, last modified by Gustaf Neumann 29 Oct 2016, at 03:56 PM

OpenACS requires, at a minimum, an operating system, database, and web server to work. Many additional programs, such as a build environment, Mail Transport Agent, and source control system, are also needed for a fully effective installation.

Table 2.2. Version Compatibility Matrix

OpenACS Version 3.2.5 4.5 4.6 4.6.1 4.6.2 4.6.3 5.0 5.1 5.2 (core) 5.3 (core) 5.4 (core) 5.5 (core) 5.6 (core) 5.7 (core) 5.8 (core) 5.9 (core)
AOLserver 3 Yes No
3.3+ad13 Maybe Yes No
3.3oacs1 Maybe Yes No
3.4.4 No
3.4.4oacs1 Maybe Yes No
3.5.5 Maybe Yes No
4.0 Maybe Yes No
4.5 No Yes
NaviServer 4.99.4 - No Maybe Yes
Tcl 8.4 Yes No
8.5.4 - Maybe Yes
XOTcl 1.6 - Yes No
2.0 - No Yes
PostgreSQL 7.4 No Yes No
8.0 No Maybe Yes Maybe No
8.1 No Yes Maybe No
8.2 No tar: no, CVS: Yes Yes Maybe No
8.3 No Yes Maybe No
8.4 No Yes No
9.0 - 9.6 No Yes
Oracle 8.1.6 Maybe Yes Maybe
8.1.7 Maybe Yes Maybe
9i No Yes Maybe
10g No Yes Maybe
11g No Maybe

The value in the cells correspond to the last version of that release, and not necessarily to all minor releases. Empty cells denote an unknown status.

for beginning developers

Created by OpenACS community, last modified by Michael Feurstein 28 Oct 2016, at 09:22 AM

Tutorials for OpenACS development

Other related tutorials

See also: OpenACS Mentorship Program

Other useful resources

Web Sites

Books

Nagios Monitoring

Created by Malte Sussdorff, last modified by Gustaf Neumann 26 Oct 2016, at 01:13 PM

To monitor your server with Nagios you can use the check_http command.

Use

check_http -h <yourip> -u /SYSTEM/dbtest -s "success"

To obtain the HTTP critical status if OpenACS can't return success, which can be either because the server isn't running or the database connection has failed.

Installing OpenACS on debian

Created by OpenACS community, last modified by Gustaf Neumann 21 Oct 2016, at 08:53 AM

This information is deprecated. Please refer to Installing OpenACS on debian.

The quicksheet versions:

You should know what you're doing when you use them.

notes

Tcl development headers are required for compiling Tcl packages yourself.

apt-get install tcl8.4-dev

Should you decide to Install OpenACS from source using general en:openacs-system-install instructions, refer to these notes for changes:

Installing Postgresql

Debian stable user should install PostGreSQL from source as detailed below, or they should use the www.backports.org backport for Postgres to get a more current version. Debian unstable users: the following process has been known to work (but you should double-check that the version of PostGreSQL is 7.3 or above):

For Debian stable users, you can use backports, by adding this line to the /etc/apt/sources.list


 

deb http://www.backports.org/debian stable bison postgresql openssl openssh tcl8.4 courier debconf spamassassin tla diff patch neon chkrootki

and perform this actions:

apt-get update
apt-get install postgresql postgresql-dev postgresql-doc
ln -s /usr/include/postgresql/ /usr/include/pgsql
ln -s /var/lib/postgres /usr/local/pgsql
ln -s /usr/include/pgsql /usr/local/pgsql/include
su postgres -c "/usr/lib/postgresql/bin/createlang plpgsql template1"

..and proceed to the next section.

Installing PostgreSQL's Tsearch2


 

apt-get install postgresql-contrib

Creating the Postgres user.

Use adduser instead of useradd. Type man adduser for more info.

Compiling PostgreSQL

On debian woody (stable, 3.0), do:

./configure --without-readline --without-zlib 

Set PostgreSQL to start on boot

[root ~]# cp /var/tmp/packages/acs-core-docs/www/files/postgresql.txt /etc/init.d/postgresql
[root ~]# chown root.root /etc/init.d/postgresql
[root ~]# chmod 755 /etc/init.d/postgresql
[root ~]# 
cp /var/tmp/openacs-5.2.0d1/packages/acs-core-docs/www/files/postgresql.txt /etc/init.d/postgresql
chown root.root /etc/init.d/postgresql
chmod 755 /etc/init.d/postgresql

Test the script

[root ~]# /etc/init.d/postgresql stop
Stopping PostgreSQL: ok
[root ~]# 

If PostgreSQL successfully stopped, then use the following command to make sure that the script is run appropriately at boot and shutdown.

[root ~]# update-rc.d postgresql defaults
 Adding system startup for /etc/init.d/postgresql ...
   /etc/rc0.d/K20postgresql -> ../init.d/postgresql
   /etc/rc1.d/K20postgresql -> ../init.d/postgresql
   /etc/rc6.d/K20postgresql -> ../init.d/postgresql
   /etc/rc2.d/S20postgresql -> ../init.d/postgresql
   /etc/rc3.d/S20postgresql -> ../init.d/postgresql
   /etc/rc4.d/S20postgresql -> ../init.d/postgresql
   /etc/rc5.d/S20postgresql -> ../init.d/postgresql
[root ~]# /etc/init.d/postgresql start
Starting PostgreSQL: ok
[root ~]#

Debian defaults to starting all services on runlevels 2-5.

Installing Tcl

You can apt-get install tcl8.4-dev if you have the right version (stable users will need to add tcl8.4 to their sources.list file as described in the "Install Postgresql" section above. You will have to use /usr/lib/tcl8.4/ instead of /usr/local/lib when you try to find the tcl libraries, however.

apt-get install tcl8.4 tcl8.4-dev

 

and proceed to installing aolserver.

When installing aolserver, replace --with-tcl=/usr/local/lib/ with --with-tcl=/usr/lib/tcl8.4.

Installing AOLserver

To install AOLserver you can use apt command:

apt-get install aolserver4 aolserver4-nscache aolserver4-nspostgres aolserver4-nssha1 tdom

After installing AOLserver, You need to make the following symbolic link:

ln -s /usr/lib/aolserver4 /usr/local/aolserver

 

 

Install OpenACS - prereqs

Created by OpenACS community, last modified by elle gonzalez 18 Oct 2016, at 07:34 AM

Prerequisites to installing OpenACS

You will need a computer with at least these minimum specifications:

  • 256MB RAM (much more if you will be running Oracle)
  • 1GB free space on the computer's hard disk (much more if you will be running Oracle)
  • a compatible, Unix-like operating system en:os-nix installed.

All of the software mentioned is open-source and available without direct costs, except for Oracle. You can obtain a free copy of Oracle for development purposes (see: en:oracle-install).

Each version of OpenACS only works with certain versions of the component software. Determine which versions you will be using by reviewing the en:openacs-compatibility-matrix.

These components in-turn depend on other software and parts of the OS. Here is a list of minimum required versions. For production systems, use the lastest stable release:

  • GNU/Linux. The installation assumes a linux kernel of 2.2.22 or newer, or 2.4.14 or newer.
  • glibc 2.2 or newer. You need recent versions of these libraries for Oracle to build and work properly. For Unicode support, you need glibc 2.2 or newer. glibc should be included in your operating system distribution.
  • GNU Make 3.76.1 or newer and gcc. PostgreSQL and AOLserver require gmake/gcc to compile.

OpenACS has a variety of packages that may require other software to be installed. Review the individual package documentation for other requirements. Also, OpenACS is commonly deployed with other related applications. For your convenience, here is a short list of some of these:

  • tclwebtest - a tool for testing web interfaces via tcl scripts.
  • ns_pam - provides PAM capabilities for AOLserver. You need this if you want OpenACS users to authenticate through a PAM module (such as RADIUS).
  • pam_radius - provides RADIUS capabilities for PAM. You need this if you want to use RADIUS authentication via PAM in OpenACS.
  • ns_ldap - provides LDAP capabilities for AOLserver. You need this if you want to use LDAP authentication in OpenACS.
  • OpenFTS - Adds full-text-search to PostgreSQL and includes a driver for AOLserver. You need this if you want users to be able to search for any text on your site. For postgres 7.4.x and higher, full text search is also available via tsearch2.
  • Analog - examines web server request logs, looks up DNS values, and produces a report. You need this if you want to see how much traffic your site is getting.
  • Balance - "a simple but powerful generic tcp proxy with round robin load balancing and failover mechanisms." You need this support or something equivalent if you are running a high-availability production site and do not have an external load balancing system.
  • Daemontools -You need this if you want AOLserver and qmail to run "supervised," meaning that they are monitored and automatically restarted if they fail. An alternative would be to run the services from inittab.
  • en:mta
  • Netqmail - You need this (or a different Mail Transport Agent) if you want your webserver to send and receive email.
  • ucspi-tcp - listens for incoming TCP connections and hands them to a program. We use it instead of inetd, which is insecure. You need this if you are running qmail.
  • DocBook (docbook-xml, docbook-xsl, libxslt, xsltproc) - for writing or editing docbook style documentation.
  • en:source-control
  • search uses these utilities to index file contents: http://wagner.pp.ru/~vitus/software/catdoc/ and  http://poppler.freedesktop.org/ based on xpdf.

next: en:openacs-system-install

Boost your application performance to serve large files!

Created by Rocael Hernández Rizzardini, last modified by Gustaf Neumann 16 Oct 2016, at 12:38 PM

In order to speed up file-deliveries, one can use the background delivery methods provided by xotcl-core. The main advantage is that with background delivery the costly connection threads are just used for permission checking and locating the file, and the time-consuming spooling of the file to the client is implemented in an asynchronous background delivery thread. Therefore, connection thread are not blocked, it is possible to spool simultaneously several hundred (thousand?) files with only a few connection threads configured.

We use this in production since several years. For example today (no semester yet) we had so far 150.000 file deliveries by background delivery.

The asynchrounous background delivery requires a small patch (2 changes, one is a backport from naviserver) and the tcl thread library (by zoran). The application code is in XOTcl is only a few lines of code and is included in xotcl-core (bgdelivery-procs.tcl).

One needs the following patch to

The patch is already included in the current head version of aolserver 4.5 and in NaviServer.

With this patch and xotcl-core, one can replace
   ns_returnfile 200 $mime_type $filename

by
   ad_returnfile_background 200 $mime_type $filename

e.g. in cr_write_content in acs-content-repository/tcl/revision-procs.tcl to activate it and to deliver files from the content-repository (file-store) in the background.

The connection thread is only used for permission management, localization of the file and writing the the reply header, the actual delivery of the file is performed via asynchronous io without using up many resources. This can handle probably a couple of thousand concurrent file deliveries without running out of resources.

Check the files that has been served since the last reboot of your NaviServer/aolserver using this method from the developer support shell:

   bgdelivery do set delivery_count


Original thread:
http://openacs.org/forums/message-view?message_id=482221 

 

 

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